Sharepoint 2010 and Access 2010 Tutorial

A very quick overview of how to share an Access database (2010) over the internet using SharePoint 2010 services, the new way to publish Access database files on the web.

It really is that simple as the steps shown in this video tutorial and you will soon learn the do’s and don’ts when the system always analyses the objects from your Access database file.

Make sure you do some more research first and know what your options are before you just start sending objects for publishing onto the internet.

Click on this link to find out more about Access database on the web

Microsoft Access 2007 Database Tutorial – Trust Center Locations

This quick two and half minute video tutorial won’t win any Emmy awards for best production and script but it puts the point across clearly when users see the unwanted ‘security’ banner warning in Access 2007 (and Access 2010) and how to avoid this banner for future use.

The author doesn’t like this feature of Access and I can understand why but Microsoft felt it was needed to add extra protection as a warning for unknown database files being opened ‘ad-hoc’.

Personally, it’s easy to stop the banner showing and therefore can be ignored once it has been dealt with. The challenge for users is how you control the settings and you will need to navigate through various screens to accomplish this which is why I’ve put the video on my blog rather than writing an article on the matter.

Ready to consider upgrading to Access 2010 or Access 2007?

“Ready to consider upgrading to Microsoft Access 2010 or Microsoft Access 2007?…It may well be worth it!…”

If you have been using Microsoft Access 2007 for a while now, moving to Access 2010 will be seamless and all you need to do is understand what new features have been introduced and what it has also replaced (where applicable).

However, a lot more users haven’t yet upgraded to Microsoft Access 2007 and are still using Access 2003 (or even an earlier version). So I’ve decided to include and combine the latest two versions and their new features to help with the transition and migration.

I will clearly point out where a feature is exclusive to either version so that you have the heads up and understanding of what you will expect to see and more importantly how to access the feature due to new GUI (graphical user interface).

Continue reading “Ready to consider upgrading to Access 2010 or Access 2007?”

Here’s a brief history of Microsoft Access

Here’s a brief history of Microsoft Access just in case you wish to step back and reminisce

A brief history of Microsoft Access

Late 1992, Microsoft released the first version of Access (version 1.0) desktop database application for the Windows operating system and was shortly replaced with version 1.1 in mid 1993 to incorporate better compatibility with other Microsoft Office products of that time and more importantly introduce the ability for programmers to code this application using Access BASIC.

Version 1.1 was buggy! and had performance issues and in the same year Microsoft released Windows 3.1 operating system along with Microsoft Office 4.3 Pro (suite of applications including Excel, Word, PowerPoint with Access – version 2.0) as it required the improved hardware, software memory and the power supported by Windows 3.1.

This was an ideal desktop database application tailored to the small to medium sized business that required a low cost database. At that time, the capacity of a disk hardrive was less than 100 MB (mega bytes) and typical document file sizes were in the 100’s of bytes. Continue reading “Here’s a brief history of Microsoft Access”

‪Microsoft Access 2010 – How to Create a Navigation Form‬

This video is a good advert that shows some of the new features – adding a navigation form with tabs that allows you to move between other forms replacing the conventional menu manager tool from previous versions.

It also gives you a quick overview of how sleek looking this version is compared to earlier versions (not so much Access 2007 but earlier) and how interactive the Ribbon Bar is to the selected item (object) with dynamic previews when formatting the components.

New users to Microsoft Access will find this a pleasing application to work with but be warned the learning curve is a little steep at first but with determination and persistence, you will be able to master this application much quicker than perhaps its predecessors.

By the way! You can always engage in a training session (or two) with me to learn Microsoft Access in quick time.