Microsoft Access: Office 365 Business Subscription Plans To Be included

Microsoft Access: Office 365 Business Subscription Plans To Be included

Microsoft plans to add Microsoft Access database to its Office 365 Business and Office 365 Business Premium subscription plans.

The above plans currently do not provide this all powerful Access application but from the 1st of December until the end of January 2017 will get this automatically updated to their accounts.

microsoft-access-office-365-business-subscription-plans-to-be-included

Microsoft Access: Office 365 Business Subscription Plans To Be included

Be aware, if an organisation subscribing to either of those two plans has elected to get Office 365 updates via the “deferred channel” update process, then Microsoft Access will start to arrive in June 2017. The Office 365 updates so-called “channels,” arrive every four months are called the “deferred channel.” Therefore, “first release for deferred channel” update release arrives every four months and is designed for testing purposes. Continue reading “Microsoft Access: Office 365 Business Subscription Plans To Be included”

Microsoft Access Database Blog – Six Years On

Microsoft Access Database Blog – Six Years On

Wow! It’s been nearly six years of providing you with Microsoft Access database blogs and I wanted to say a big thank you to all you, the subscribers and of course those who entrusted me by purchasing one of my e-products and e-books.

If this is your first visit to my blog then welcome 🙂 Take a look at this blog site and browse the history by selecting the Archive ‘drop-down’ box by month.

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There are over 300 posts and several ways to navigate through the archives by clicking a category, selecting a month or using the recent posts feature.

Microsoft Access Database Blog – Six Years On

Remember, to sign up for your free weekly tips and e-book. 

If you want to know more detail or like some of my e-product utilities, why not take a chance and purchase them? In fact, there’s no risk at all as I provide a full money back guarantee plus a 30-day email support to help you through the learning curve (which is not really too steep!).

Once again, a big thank you to all for visiting my Microsoft Access database blog 🙂

Microsoft Access Database Templates – Some Are Even Free!

Microsoft Access Database Templates – Some Are Even Free!

With the latest version of Microsoft Access database (2016) and following on with tradition, Microsoft provides a selection of free Access templates and these can be found via a new database file action where thumbnails are available to get you started.

Quite a few of the standard templates are reasonable and they do require more custom design time to at least make them more user friendly.

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However, take the above ‘Tasks’ database example which created several different objects including tables, queries, forms and reports – In fact, 30 objects were generated which also included macros and a little VBA code.

Other database templates can also been found like Continue reading “Microsoft Access Database Templates – Some Are Even Free!”

Accountants Should Dump Microsoft Excel for Microsoft Access Database

Accountants Should Dump Microsoft Excel for Microsoft Access Database

I’ve been saying this for years, Microsoft Access databases is simply far better than Excel. In fact Access is just Excel on steroids!

As the following link to this article says “we are all Excel-aholics who can’t get through the day without busting out a spreadsheet…“. 

Here’s the article link: http://goingconcern.com/post/accountants-should-dump-microsoft-excel-database-software

Accountants Should Dump Microsoft Excel for Microsoft Access Database

Accountants Should Dump Microsoft Excel for Microsoft Access Database

The default reaction is to lean towards Excel and that’s understandable but that’s because it’s how we are all first taught to use this application and the ease of how a spreadsheet  can be to manipulate data and analyse out.

But where data integrity and security protection  is key to the maintenance and workflows of a system, you simple have to consider Microsoft Access databases.

There’s also a compromise where both could be used and this maybe a fair outcome to get the best of both using their strengths and dismissing the weaknesses at the same time.

Want to learn more? Take a look at my eBook bundle covering the key objects of Microsoft Access database.

Microsoft Access Database: What is… Some Popular Questions

Microsoft Access Database: What is… Some Popular Questions

Here are some questions I’ve been asked over the years regarding Microsoft Access databases which I thought you may want to review. 

Q: What features make Microsoft Access a valuable tool over say the more popular Excel spreadsheet or any other desktop software?

A: The key feature is the ability to “ask questions” and perform actions with large amounts of the data via Queries which is its real strength.  For the common MS Office user who doesn’t know anything about MS Access databases, this application can seem fairly user-friendly and most users tend to lean to a more comfortable environment, namely Excel.

microsoft-access-database-what-is-some-popular-questions

Q: What’s the best way to start learning Microsoft Access?

A: It all depends on how you best absorb information and learn new technologies. Some people prefer a book but that can be quite time consuming and hard to follow as most books tend to be Continue reading “Microsoft Access Database: What is… Some Popular Questions”

How to Create an Autokeys Closing Macro in Microsoft Access

How to Create an Autokeys Closing Macro in Microsoft Access

As a follow on from my last post about Microsoft Access Macros, here’s a good working example clearly explained using the ‘unsafe’ CloseWindow command…

It walked you through creating a custom hotkey for Microsoft Access (using version 2010 though it will also apply through to the current version, 2016) which used the ‘Autokeys’ macro.

This macro shows you how to avoid a problem during a design and run-time for a form where incorrectly closing this object can save filters and sorts into their properties and alter their behaviour when re-visiting the form.
Continue reading “How to Create an Autokeys Closing Macro in Microsoft Access”

Comparing Microsoft Access App and MS Access Desktop Database

Comparing Microsoft Access 2016 App and MS Access Desktop Database

Here’s an overview of the comparisons between using Microsoft Access 2016 App and the desktop version.

An Access app is a database that you design and modify in Microsoft Access 2016 and use in a standard web browser. The data and database objects are stored in SQL Server or Microsoft Azure SQL Database, so you can share the data within your organisation using on-premises SharePoint or Office 365 for business. An Access App is created either from a template or from scratch.

Generally, a desktop database is a database system created to run on a single computer. Desktop databases are much more limited and constrained than larger data centre or data warehouse systems, where primitive database software is replaced by sophisticated hardware and networking setups.

An MS Access desktop database helps you store and track any kind of information such as inventory, contacts, or business processes. Like the Access app, you can also create an Access desktop database by using a template or creating it from scratch.

How to identify the two types of Access templates? An Access app template has a globe icon in its picture and the title of the app does not contain “desktop.” For example, “Asset tracking” or “Custom web app.” While an Access desktop database template has no globe in the picture and its title has “desktop” in it. For example, “Desktop asset tracking,” or “Blank desktop database.”

microsoft acces-app-icon microsoft access-desktop-icon

Access app and Access desktop database serve different purposes. You may want to check the table below to see which one works best for you. Continue reading “Comparing Microsoft Access App and MS Access Desktop Database”

Microsoft Access Database: Access DLookup Function Example with Access VBA

Microsoft Access Database: Access DLookup Function Example with Access VBA

Take a look at this six and half minute video of how to utilise the Access DLookup function using a little of Access VBA code too (not too difficult but necessary in this example).

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZmcGlywA4ss&feature=related

Microsoft Access Database: Access DLookup Function Example with Access VBA

Of course you do not have to use Access VBA code when applying the Access DLookup function. Instead, you can populate fields by using a calculation or auto-lookup query instead.

Access DLookupWith the calculation method however, this is just an expression and will not be updatable should data in fields need to be edited.

Take a look at my eBook on More Access Database Queries to learn about the ‘Auto Lookup’ query and other more adavnced techniques.