Designing A Multi-Table Query – Part 3

To view Part-1 of this series, (by Ben Beitler ), Click here >>

Creating A Multi-Table Query

Since we have planned our question, we are prepared to design and run it. If you have made written plans for your query, make certain to reference them frequently all through the ms access query design process.

These are the steps in creating a multi-table query:

1. Choose the Query Design from the Create tab on the Ribbon.image12. In the Show Table dialog box that shows, choose each table you want to include in your query, then click Add. After adding the tables, click Close. In our example, we needed information from the Customers and Orders table, so we’ll add them. Continue reading “Designing A Multi-Table Query – Part 3”

Designing A Multi-Table Query – Part 2

To view Part-1 of this series, (by Ben Beitler ), Click here >>

accessdatabasetutorial-2Queries can be hard to comprehend and fabricate if you don’t have a smart thought of what you’re trying to search and how to find it. A one-table MS access query can be simple enough to make up as you go along. However, to construct anything more powerful, you will need to plan the query initially.

Planning a MS access query

When planning a query that uses multiple tables, follow these steps:

  1. Define precisely what you wish to know. If you could ask your database any question, what would it be? Building a MS access query is more complex than just asking a question, but knowing exactly what question you wish to answer is vital to building a suitable query.
  2. Identify each type of information you want to include in your query output. Which fields contain this data?
  3. Locate the fields you want included in your MS access query. Which tables are they contained in?
  4. Determine the criteria the information in every field needs to meet. Consider the question you asked in the initial step. Which fields do you have to look for particular data? What information are you searching for? How will you search for it?

Continue reading “Designing A Multi-Table Query – Part 2”

Microsoft Access Database Forms: Should We Use Unbound Forms?

Microsoft Access Database Forms: Should We Use Unbound Forms?

I’ve always been a big fan of Microsoft Access databases, why? Because I like the way a rich application like this can be customised and designed from the floor up with little IT programming and development knowledge. Plus, I like building things 🙂

As a recap, knowing the difference between what an unbound versus a bound Access form is will help divide the distinction and allow you to determine which approach will suit best.

access-database-forms-should-we-use-unbound-forms

Microsoft Access like any other development IDE will provide an endless set of properties across the ‘one-stop shop’ set of objects and forms are no different. One property we are talking about of course is Continue reading “Microsoft Access Database Forms: Should We Use Unbound Forms?”

How to Create an Autokeys Closing Macro in Microsoft Access

How to Create an Autokeys Closing Macro in Microsoft Access

As a follow on from my last post about Microsoft Access Macros, here’s a good working example clearly explained using the ‘unsafe’ CloseWindow command…

It walked you through creating a custom hotkey for Microsoft Access (using version 2010 though it will also apply through to the current version, 2016) which used the ‘Autokeys’ macro.

This macro shows you how to avoid a problem during a design and run-time for a form where incorrectly closing this object can save filters and sorts into their properties and alter their behaviour when re-visiting the form.
Continue reading “How to Create an Autokeys Closing Macro in Microsoft Access”

Comparing Microsoft Access App and MS Access Desktop Database

Comparing Microsoft Access 2016 App and MS Access Desktop Database

Here’s an overview of the comparisons between using Microsoft Access 2016 App and the desktop version.

An Access app is a database that you design and modify in Microsoft Access 2016 and use in a standard web browser. The data and database objects are stored in SQL Server or Microsoft Azure SQL Database, so you can share the data within your organisation using on-premises SharePoint or Office 365 for business. An Access App is created either from a template or from scratch.

Generally, a desktop database is a database system created to run on a single computer. Desktop databases are much more limited and constrained than larger data centre or data warehouse systems, where primitive database software is replaced by sophisticated hardware and networking setups.

An MS Access desktop database helps you store and track any kind of information such as inventory, contacts, or business processes. Like the Access app, you can also create an Access desktop database by using a template or creating it from scratch.

How to identify the two types of Access templates? An Access app template has a globe icon in its picture and the title of the app does not contain “desktop.” For example, “Asset tracking” or “Custom web app.” While an Access desktop database template has no globe in the picture and its title has “desktop” in it. For example, “Desktop asset tracking,” or “Blank desktop database.”

microsoft acces-app-icon microsoft access-desktop-icon

Access app and Access desktop database serve different purposes. You may want to check the table below to see which one works best for you. Continue reading “Comparing Microsoft Access App and MS Access Desktop Database”

Microsoft Access Database 2013 Splash Screen Form

Microsoft Access Database 2013 Splash Screen Form

Back in 2012, I posted an article on how to create a splash screen form without VBA code too using a little trick to name your database with an .bmp extension to it – a hidden gem!

However, in this quick video tutorial, the alternative way is to create a navigation form in Microsoft Access (from version 2010) and take advantage of the Access options and a simple macro...take a look…

Excuse the music and text narratives but hopefully you should have been able to follow the prompts?

There are other Access form options and properties to set to help present a smoother and more polished form including modal, pop-up Continue reading “Microsoft Access Database 2013 Splash Screen Form”

Microsoft Access Database 2013 Tutorial On Forms

Microsoft Access Database 2013 Tutorial On Forms

Microsoft Access forms are ways of making your data entry convenient, safe without exposing its profound work to most database users and provide a smooth workflow reflecting business practices. The benefit of taking the time to build good and workable forms will pay dividends later.

Importing/Creating The Database

In creating an access form, the first thing you need to do is to either import or create the database. As a pre-step, follow the simple steps below:

  1. When you open your Microsoft Access 2013, select “Blank desktop database”.
  2. To import the database, go to “External Data” tab then select XML file or another file format.
  3. Browse the location where you either unzip the file or load the file and click the OK button.

Microsoft Access Database 2013 Tutorial On Forms

microsoft access database 2013 tutorial on forms

An Access Form is a customisable design object that allows users to have an accessible and easier database experience. A well-designed form supports Continue reading “Microsoft Access Database 2013 Tutorial On Forms”

Microsoft Access Database Tutorial: Creating a Menu Form

Microsoft Access Database Tutorial: Creating a Menu Form

In this tutorial you will learn how to create a main menu form in your Microsoft Access Database.

Take a quick look at the video tutorial below which will step you through the very basics as I’m often asked how easy is it to build your own MS Access menu forms.

Ignore the general look and feel of the forms demonstrated but more importantly, notice how easy it really is to create command buttons Continue reading “Microsoft Access Database Tutorial: Creating a Menu Form”

Microsoft Access Database 2013: Building A Navigation Control Form

Microsoft Access Database 2013: Building A Navigation Control Form

This quick three and half minute video tutorial will demonstrate how easy it is to build Microsoft Access database navigation control forms keeping the controls and property settings to a minimum whilst also utilising the ribbon bar too…

There’s no voice over but some light melodic tones to easily follow the tips and techniques in building that navigation control form.

Microsoft Access Database 2013: Building A Navigation Control Form

Of course, one assumes you have also pre-prepared and built either the forms or reports that will be linked and associated to each tab added which Continue reading “Microsoft Access Database 2013: Building A Navigation Control Form”

Microsoft Access Database Forms: Highlight Current Record For A Continuous Form

Microsoft Access Database Forms: Highlight Current Record For A Continuous Form

As you migrate from version to version, working with Microsoft Access database forms becomes more intuitive and easier to design and implement using the pre-built templates, wizards and improving richer set of formatting tools.

Conditional formatting (once it was introduced) started life as a setting for up to three conditional formats which satisfied most requirements but now the with the later versions, it’s layered and can exceed this number for true flexibility and complex conditioning.

microsoft access database forms highlight current record

The point here is what level of setting conditional criteria for this format do you know?

In this simple example, mixing some Access VBA code into the mix and using just one condition, you get Continue reading “Microsoft Access Database Forms: Highlight Current Record For A Continuous Form”