MS Access Database Images: How To Correctly Handle Them ?

Microsoft access database was never really designed to handle images the same way other Office applications do and maybe it was deemed as bit of an afterthought.

Different versions lead to different challenges and the latest version (2016) still have issues ending sometimes up with invisible images on those forms and reports. This is further complicated by having a 32-bit version of Access 2016 (16.0.4229.1024) and perhaps not the 64-bit version installed but that may not be a good enough reason to use the 64-bit version at all (unless of course images are your thing!).

In Access, images should appear properly but some simply do not. The original Images used this application was the BMP file format and they continue to properly show up however, other graphic types such as GIF, JPG and PNG formats may end up as a blank non-starter!

One thing you could check out is the database’s Picture Property Storage Format when the picture was added to the form or report. This can be found under the ‘Access Options’ setting for the Current Database:https://www.accessdatabasetutorial.com/

There two options are:

  • Preserve source image format (smaller file size)
  • Convert all picture data to bitmaps (compatible with Access 2003 and earlier)

If the image is added when the above option is set to the second option (Convert), the non-BMP graphics do not appear in the 2016 version. Continue reading “MS Access Database Images: How To Correctly Handle Them ?”

Why it is Essential to Regularly Compact and Repair Microsoft Access Databases?

Building Your First Database with Microsoft Access 3One of the most powerful features of Microsoft Access database is that it allows databases to consistently increase in size. This way you do not have to worry about size limitations while developing the databases or while working on them. On the other hand, this means that even if you delete a record or even entire tables, Access simply indicates that the space may be made use of, for new records without actually giving up the space. Similarly, even if any extra space is created when you shorten or possibly modify records, that space is not released. This will not only cause enormous amount of defragmentation of the database, but more importantly it will eventually lead to corruption in the MDB files. The only way to restore data from the damaged files may then be to resort to high level MDB recovery.

The best way to make use of the extra space and the space created by deletions is to regularly compact the Access database. On the other hand, not compacting the Access database at all will mean that the extra space is being wasted and the database will continue to demand more space as more records are added.

Continue reading “Why it is Essential to Regularly Compact and Repair Microsoft Access Databases?”

Brief history of Microsoft Access

Here’s a brief history of Microsoft Access just in case you wish to step back and reminisce

A brief history of Microsoft Access

Late 1992, Microsoft released the first version of Access (version 1.0) desktop database application for the Windows operating system and was shortly replaced with version 1.1 in mid 1993 to incorporate better compatibility with other Microsoft Office products of that time and more importantly introduce the ability for programmers to code this application using Access BASIC.

Version 1.1 was buggy! and had performance issues and in the same year Microsoft released Windows 3.1 operating system along with Microsoft Office 4.3 Pro (suite of applications including Excel, Word, PowerPoint with Access – version 2.0) as it required the improved hardware, software memory and the power supported by Windows 3.1.

This was an ideal desktop database application tailored to the small to medium sized business that required a low cost database. At that time, the capacity of a disk hardrive was less than 100 MB (mega bytes) and typical document file sizes were in the 100’s of bytes. Continue reading “Brief history of Microsoft Access”