What is the function of primary key when creating a database in access

create_a_database MS accessWhen building an access database, the primary key is important and an important thing to note when creating a database in access. Before continuing you should know what primary keys mean.

What is a primary key

Primary keys are fields or fields with values that are unique throughout a table when building an access database. Primary keys can be used to refer to entire records, each record has a different value for the key. A table can only contain just one primary key. Ms Access will either automatically create a primary key field for you when Continue reading “What is the function of primary key when creating a database in access”

Time-saving tips when MS Access database

Time-saving tips when MS Access database

Timing is very important in everything we do in life, in this post you will find out tricks to easily optimize your speed when working with MS Access database, this tips will also help you manage the time while creating access database.

Microsoft Access database 2007 Database Tutorial – Trust Center Locations

This quick two and half minute video tutorial won’t win any Emmy awards for best production and script but it puts the point across clearly when users see the unwanted ‘security’ banner warning in Access 2007 (and Access 2010) and how to avoid this banner for future use.

The author doesn’t like this feature of access database and I can understand why but Microsoft felt it was needed to add extra protection as a warning for unknown access database files being opened ‘ad-hoc’.

Personally, it’s easy to stop the banner showing and therefore can be ignored once it has been dealt with. The challenge for users is how you control the settings and you will need to navigate through various screens to accomplish this which is why I’ve put the video on my blog rather than writing an article on the matter.

Ready to consider upgrading to Access 2010 or Access 2007?

“Ready to consider upgrading to Microsoft Access 2010 or Microsoft Access 2007?…It may well be worth it!…”

If you have been using Microsoft Access 2007 for a while now, moving to Access 2010 will be seamless and all you need to do is understand what new features have been introduced and what it has also replaced (where applicable).

However, a lot more users haven’t yet upgraded to Microsoft Access 2007 and are still using Access 2003 (or even an earlier version). So I’ve decided to include and combine the latest two versions and their new features to help with the transition and migration.

I will clearly point out where a feature is exclusive to either version so that you have the heads up and understanding of what you will expect to see and more importantly how to access the feature due to new GUI (graphical user interface).

Continue reading “Ready to consider upgrading to Access 2010 or Access 2007?”

Why it is Essential to Regularly Compact and Repair Microsoft Access Databases?

Building Your First Database with Microsoft Access 3One of the most powerful features of Microsoft Access database is that it allows databases to consistently increase in size. This way you do not have to worry about size limitations while developing the databases or while working on them. On the other hand, this means that even if you delete a record or even entire tables, Access simply indicates that the space may be made use of, for new records without actually giving up the space. Similarly, even if any extra space is created when you shorten or possibly modify records, that space is not released. This will not only cause enormous amount of defragmentation of the database, but more importantly it will eventually lead to corruption in the MDB files. The only way to restore data from the damaged files may then be to resort to high level MDB recovery.

The best way to make use of the extra space and the space created by deletions is to regularly compact the Access database. On the other hand, not compacting the Access database at all will mean that the extra space is being wasted and the database will continue to demand more space as more records are added.

Continue reading “Why it is Essential to Regularly Compact and Repair Microsoft Access Databases?”

Brief history of Microsoft Access

Here’s a brief history of Microsoft Access just in case you wish to step back and reminisce

A brief history of Microsoft Access

Late 1992, Microsoft released the first version of Access (version 1.0) desktop database application for the Windows operating system and was shortly replaced with version 1.1 in mid 1993 to incorporate better compatibility with other Microsoft Office products of that time and more importantly introduce the ability for programmers to code this application using Access BASIC.

Version 1.1 was buggy! and had performance issues and in the same year Microsoft released Windows 3.1 operating system along with Microsoft Office 4.3 Pro (suite of applications including Excel, Word, PowerPoint with Access – version 2.0) as it required the improved hardware, software memory and the power supported by Windows 3.1.

This was an ideal desktop database application tailored to the small to medium sized business that required a low cost database. At that time, the capacity of a disk hardrive was less than 100 MB (mega bytes) and typical document file sizes were in the 100’s of bytes. Continue reading “Brief history of Microsoft Access”

Structuring Queries In Access 2007

how-to-create-a-microsoft-access-database-new-form-2007People prefer to keep complex data sets in databases rather than in flat files because data can be found and grouped more precisely when it is stored in a database. The ability to draw data out of a database depends upon the ability to structure queries, or requests that define specific records. Structuring queries in Access 2007 is relatively easy because Access is designed to handle many different types of operators.

An operator is a special symbol or reserved word that triggers the database to act in a certain way. Access 2007 recognises several types of operators, including comparison operators, arithmetic operators, logical operators and special expressions such as like, between..and, in, and is null. You may also use combinations of these types of operators when structuring queries in Access 2007.

Comparison operators ask Access 2007 to perform a comparison between two values. In a query, a comparison operator can locate all records where a field value is greater than, less than, equal to, not equal to, greater than or equal to, or less than or equal to a specified value. Comparison operators can be applied to all fields that contain a literal value. A literal value is a value that has been directly entered into the field. Access recognizes four literals: text, numbers, dates and times, and constants.

Continue reading “Structuring Queries In Access 2007”

Access 2007 – The Navigation Pane Window View

This video tutorial is a good overview for those new to the Access 2007 screen and how objects are managed into groups and other filter views. It is a vast improvement from the previous database window (of earlier versions).

The Navigation Pane Window view contains all the Access objects stored as it is in one file. You can create, edit, open, delete, duplicate, search and maintain natural groups.

I like the quick ‘right’ mouse click on the ‘Navigation Pane‘ banner to set properties including showing and hiding system objects.

Here’s one of my shortcut tips; press the F11 function key from the keyboard to toggle the hide/show the Navigation Pane Window view instead of clicking the >> << chevron icons on the banner.

Microsoft Access Database 2007 tutorial

MS Access 2007 tutorialWhen Microsoft Access first appeared in the early 1990’s it revolutionized the desktop database market. Most versions have been similar to each other. Now with Access 2007 we see the most radical changes yet introduced by Microsoft. When working your way through an MS Access 2007 tutorial, a hardcore traditional user of MS Access is either going to love or hate these new changes.

So what is different about this new version? The interface is completely different and instead of menus and toolbars there is the Ribbon. The Ribbon is divided into sections and each section holds the relevant commands for designing and running a database. Continue reading “Microsoft Access Database 2007 tutorial”

Planning an Access Database – Video

Learn access database,This video from YouTube takes you from the very beginning even before working with the actual database application which is often overlooked when designing and planning an Access database.

It’s a good guide to help relate how you actually would use and benefit from any database in the ‘real world’ making this a very human and user friendlier approach and best of all it’s ‘geek’ speak and jargon free!